Retain some control. If you upload photos of yourself, or friends/family with consent, it's worth going for the 'rights managed' licence option – otherwise you'll have little to no control over how your images are used (eg, you could star in an ad for haemorrhoid cream). See Alamy's page on understanding stock image licensing for more on the different types of licences.
This is a great article! I honestly had never even heard of some of these money-making methods (e.g., selling plasma, flipping domains, renting your car for ad space, etc.). While I would presume that there exist various risks associated with, say, plasma donation (which would explain why it is so little-known), many of the other methods seem relatively simple and, potentially, very lucrative. It’s kind of interesting that they’re not as well-known as some of the other methods listed despite their not having any apparent drawbacks (such as the ad space on one’s car). I guess the old saying that there is a job out there for everyone may, to some extent, actually be true.
Bloggers and webmasters are always looking for new and unique content for their blogs and websites. Digital point forums can be a good place to start making decent money even though its full of scammers and spammers. You will be paid $2-$10 per article depending on the quality. You’ll be instructed on the quality of articles, niche, number of words, etc. while making a deal.
Next, you’ll need the right tools. You can be as complicated or simple as you want depending on your comfort with audio equipment, but at the minimum you’ll want a microphone and software for recording your voice. Companies like Behringer, Blue, Focusrite, and others sell studio-quality plug-and-play podcast setups that can get you recording today.
Did you ever guess that your obsession with Twitter or Pinterest could become a key employability skill? I know! You first start Pinterest, you think it’ll be a little harmless fun, and then you’ve got hundreds of boards with thousands of pins on DIY projects you’re never going to do and recipes you’re never going to make (sorry, real talk) – but you also understand all the lingo, know who the influencers are, and have an experienced eye for what makes an enticing Pinterest post. Maybe this same story applies, except with Facebook (you know the power of groups and how FB ads work), Twitter (you’re always up on the latest trending hashtags), or Instagram (you follow all the influencers in your niche).
Robert said he did an average of 4-6 of these gigs per year for a while depending on his schedule and the work involved. The best part is, he charged a flat rate that usually worked out to around $100 per hour. And remember, this was pay he was earning to advise people on the best ways to use social media tools like Facebook and Pinterest to grow their brands.
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